ripperdoc's clinic

A schizofrenic braindump, a stream of cyberpunk, post-cyberpunk, neopunk, futurism and sci-fi items, inspiration for my writing and game design. Usually managed by my trusty auto-posting AI residing in a possum-brain in my kitchen sink.

Go ahead and inject into my brainfeed via Twitter or Tumblr submit. Aslo, go ahead and challenge my AI with a question (warning, it bites).
1069 | 15.2.2014 | 6 months ago |


178 | 24.8.2013 | 1 year ago |


citadel2497:

Heavily agumented? Then beware body snatchers: street gangs who aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty for those valuable mods in your body. 
If you only had a leg or an arm replaced, you might be lucky enough to wake up in an alley with nothing more than blood loss and a missing limb. However, if your mods go deeper inside of you, chances are the last thing you’ll remember is a scalpel piercing your flesh. 

citadel2497:

Heavily agumented? Then beware body snatchers: street gangs who aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty for those valuable mods in your body.

If you only had a leg or an arm replaced, you might be lucky enough to wake up in an alley with nothing more than blood loss and a missing limb. However, if your mods go deeper inside of you, chances are the last thing you’ll remember is a scalpel piercing your flesh. 

(Source: skul4aface.blogspot.com, via tacticalneuralimplant)

409 | 12.8.2013 | 1 year ago |


Nice party trick with throat cybernetics…
limbsa7o:

Aaron Beck, Concept art for Elysium. 

Nice party trick with throat cybernetics…

limbsa7o:

Aaron Beck, Concept art for Elysium. 

(via squidtestes)

11 | 11.8.2013 | 1 year ago |


hard-wired-info:

Kinski by ~fightpunch
Kinski in the Machine
Visit the original, leave a comment, support the author!

hard-wired-info:

Kinski by ~fightpunch

Kinski in the Machine

Visit the original, leave a comment, support the author!

1021 | 13.3.2013 | 1 year ago |


Damnit, in our cyberpunk RPG this wasn’t due to happen for another decade or so!

World premiere of muscle and nerve controlled arm prosthesis
For the first time an operation has been conducted, at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, where electrodes have been permanently implanted in nerves and muscles of an amputee to directly control an arm prosthesis. The result allows natural control of an advanced robotic prosthesis, similarly to the motions of a natural limb.
A surgical team led by Dr Rickard Brånemark, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, has carried out the first operation of its kind, where neuromuscular electrodes have been permanently implanted in an amputee. The operation was possible thanks to new advanced technology developed by Max Ortiz Catalan, supervised by Rickard Brånemark at Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Bo Håkansson at Chalmers University of Technology.
“The new technology is a major breakthrough that has many advantages over current technology, which provides very limited functionality to patients with missing limbs,” says Rickard Brånemark.
Big challengesThere have been two major issues on the advancement of robotic prostheses: 1) how to firmly attach an artificial limb to the human body; 2) how to intuitively and efficiently control the prosthesis in order to be truly useful and regain lost functionality.
“This technology solves both these problems by combining a bone anchored prosthesis with implanted electrodes,” said Rickard Brånemark, who along with his team has developed a pioneering implant system called Opra, Osseointegrated Prostheses for the Rehabilitation of Amputees.
A titanium screw, so-called osseointegrated implant, is used to anchor the prosthesis directly to the stump, which provides many advantages over a traditionally used socket prosthesis.
“It allows complete degree of motion for the patient, fewer skin related problems and a more natural feeling that the prosthesis is part of the body. Overall, it brings better quality of life to people who are amputees,” says Rickard Brånemark.
How it worksPresently, robotic prostheses rely on electrodes over the skin to pick up the muscles electrical activity to drive few actions by the prosthesis. The problem with this approach is that normally only two functions are regained out of the tens of different movements an able-body is capable of. By using implanted electrodes, more signals can be retrieved, and therefore control of more movements is possible. Furthermore, it is also possible to provide the patient with natural perception, or “feeling”, through neural stimulation.
“We believe that implanted electrodes, together with a long-term stable human-machine interface provided by the osseointegrated implant, is a breakthrough that will pave the way for a new era in limb replacement,” says Rickard Brånemark.
The patientThe first patient has recently been treated with this technology, and the first tests gave excellent results. The patient, a previous user of a robotic hand, reported major difficulties in operating that device in cold and hot environments and interference from shoulder muscles. These issues have now disappeared, thanks to the new system, and the patient has now reported that almost no effort is required to generate control signals. Moreover, tests have shown that more movements may be performed in a coordinated way, and that several movements can be performed simultaneously.
“The next step will be to test electrical stimulation of nerves to see if the patient can sense environmental stimuli, that is, get an artificial sensation. The ultimate goal is to make a more natural way to replace a lost limb, to improve the quality of life for people with amputations,” says Rickard Brånemark.

via neurosciencestuff

Damnit, in our cyberpunk RPG this wasn’t due to happen for another decade or so!

World premiere of muscle and nerve controlled arm prosthesis

For the first time an operation has been conducted, at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, where electrodes have been permanently implanted in nerves and muscles of an amputee to directly control an arm prosthesis. The result allows natural control of an advanced robotic prosthesis, similarly to the motions of a natural limb.

A surgical team led by Dr Rickard Brånemark, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, has carried out the first operation of its kind, where neuromuscular electrodes have been permanently implanted in an amputee. The operation was possible thanks to new advanced technology developed by Max Ortiz Catalan, supervised by Rickard Brånemark at Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Bo Håkansson at Chalmers University of Technology.

“The new technology is a major breakthrough that has many advantages over current technology, which provides very limited functionality to patients with missing limbs,” says Rickard Brånemark.

Big challenges
There have been two major issues on the advancement of robotic prostheses: 1) how to firmly attach an artificial limb to the human body; 2) how to intuitively and efficiently control the prosthesis in order to be truly useful and regain lost functionality.

“This technology solves both these problems by combining a bone anchored prosthesis with implanted electrodes,” said Rickard Brånemark, who along with his team has developed a pioneering implant system called Opra, Osseointegrated Prostheses for the Rehabilitation of Amputees.

A titanium screw, so-called osseointegrated implant, is used to anchor the prosthesis directly to the stump, which provides many advantages over a traditionally used socket prosthesis.

“It allows complete degree of motion for the patient, fewer skin related problems and a more natural feeling that the prosthesis is part of the body. Overall, it brings better quality of life to people who are amputees,” says Rickard Brånemark.

How it works
Presently, robotic prostheses rely on electrodes over the skin to pick up the muscles electrical activity to drive few actions by the prosthesis. The problem with this approach is that normally only two functions are regained out of the tens of different movements an able-body is capable of. By using implanted electrodes, more signals can be retrieved, and therefore control of more movements is possible. Furthermore, it is also possible to provide the patient with natural perception, or “feeling”, through neural stimulation.

“We believe that implanted electrodes, together with a long-term stable human-machine interface provided by the osseointegrated implant, is a breakthrough that will pave the way for a new era in limb replacement,” says Rickard Brånemark.

The patient
The first patient has recently been treated with this technology, and the first tests gave excellent results. The patient, a previous user of a robotic hand, reported major difficulties in operating that device in cold and hot environments and interference from shoulder muscles. These issues have now disappeared, thanks to the new system, and the patient has now reported that almost no effort is required to generate control signals. Moreover, tests have shown that more movements may be performed in a coordinated way, and that several movements can be performed simultaneously.

“The next step will be to test electrical stimulation of nerves to see if the patient can sense environmental stimuli, that is, get an artificial sensation. The ultimate goal is to make a more natural way to replace a lost limb, to improve the quality of life for people with amputations,” says Rickard Brånemark.

via neurosciencestuff

(via emergentfutures)

432 | 7.3.2013 | 1 year ago |


Awesome gif of cyber-eyes from Dredd (but I seriously doubt a cybereye would have actual mechanical bladed aperture…)

Awesome gif of cyber-eyes from Dredd (but I seriously doubt a cybereye would have actual mechanical bladed aperture…)

(via tacticalneuralimplant)

46 | 8.1.2013 | 1 year ago |


Escort - or CEO of a company? [cyberpunk art]

Escort - or CEO of a company? [cyberpunk art]

(Source: anonymousmutekittenssociety, via trenchcoatsheep)

27 | 10.12.2012 | 1 year ago |


Cpt. Ludov, externally modified, reporting for duty.

Cpt. Ludov, externally modified, reporting for duty.

(Source: sadgirlcore, via trenchcoatsheep)

75 | 10.11.2012 | 1 year ago |


emergentfutures:

Man shows off his bionic robot arm


In another bit of “life imitates the movies”, we now see the latest advancement in robotic arms - courtesy of Nigel Ackland, a 53-year-old man who lost his hand in an accident six years ago. Ackland shows off his bebionic3 myoelectric hand (made from aluminum and alloy), which can do things like peel vegetables and type on a computer keyboard, among other things.

Full Story: ITWorld

emergentfutures:

Man shows off his bionic robot arm

In another bit of “life imitates the movies”, we now see the latest advancement in robotic arms - courtesy of Nigel Ackland, a 53-year-old man who lost his hand in an accident six years ago. Ackland shows off his bebionic3 myoelectric hand (made from aluminum and alloy), which can do things like peel vegetables and type on a computer keyboard, among other things.


Full Story: ITWorld

46 | 30.10.2012 | 1 year ago |


71 | 30.10.2012 | 1 year ago |


5 | 20.10.2012 | 1 year ago |


18 | 11.10.2012 | 1 year ago |


23 | 15.8.2012 | 2 years ago |


463 | 7.8.2012 | 2 years ago |