ripperdoc's clinic

A schizofrenic braindump, a stream of cyberpunk, post-cyberpunk, neopunk, futurism and sci-fi items, inspiration for my writing and game design. Usually managed by my trusty auto-posting AI residing in a possum-brain in my kitchen sink.

Go ahead and inject into my brainfeed via Twitter or Tumblr submit. Aslo, go ahead and challenge my AI with a question (warning, it bites).
0 | 27.4.2013 | 1 year ago |


Elevator tours of restless decommissioned military robo-vultures squatting in the high-rise ruins of Dubai’s corporate decay.
Oh yes, imagine what happens to all those self-reliant, masterless drones - they becom part of urban nature? From @subtopes on Twitter
5 | 7.3.2013 | 1 year ago |


In an effort to crack down on counterfeit computer chips, the Defense
Logistics Agency (DLA) will start requiring companies that sell the
devices to the US military to use DNA-tagging to assure their
authenticity. DNA-tagging technology involves engineering plant DNA and
mixing the unique strands with ink used on the chips, or mixing the
strands into materials used in the chips’ manufacture. The technology
is used in European banknotes and has helped convict more than 30
counterfeiters.

Like Bruce Sterling, who digs up truckloads of this stuff on his blog, I’m asking the same questions: why does DLA have problem with counterfeit chips, is there even something called DNA-tagging and has this been used on banknotes for a long time?
3 | 10.1.2013 | 1 year ago |


Dad hires in-game hitsquad to kill his son’s characters
This will become normal. No more words need to be spoken. (via Boing Boing).
13 | 3.12.2012 | 1 year ago |


In 400 years time angry middle class teenagers will lead protests against DRM on cloning while wearing Osama Bin Laden masks.
via @timmaughan
17 | 20.7.2012 | 2 years ago |


In the year 2057, neuroscience has reverse-engineered the human brain to uncover the inner workings of the mind, and two-thirds of the world’s population are implanted with biocores; organic microcomputers that interface billions of people to the world-wide electronic Grid. A retired police officer is called back to the Force to help counter a massive cyber threat looming over the Accra metropolis. Meanwhile, a young girl from a coastal village struggles to find employment, only to find herself descending steeply into the dangerous world of electronic crime. These two stories are inextricably linked with a third; the unfolding memories of a renegade computer programmer, memories which reveal a life of struggle in the heart of the Sahara, unearthing a sinister plot reaching into the highest corridors of power. This novel is a psychological thriller that explores the boundaries of the human mind through the interwoven stories of three Africans living in the middle of the 21st century; three souls who are drawn into the heart of a vast conspiracy in one turbulent night on the fast-paced, high-tech streets of ACCRA.

AfroCyberPunk » Accra: 2057

Seems like Jonathan Dotse is hitting it out of the ballpark for yet another homerun!

(via asysa)

(via asysa)

4 | 19.7.2011 | 3 years ago |


94% of global millionaires fear riots/unrest in the streets that calls for their blood. As well they should
WSJ via John Robb
2 | 23.5.2011 | 3 years ago |


On the way home from the bar, she developed a limp. He offered to take a look. Said he was an expert in this kind of thing, which was a lie, which was fine because she wasn’t really limping. He opened her up, ignoring the warning stickers and pretending to poke around. She said she felt much better.

Later, they voided their warranties against the cold rough bricks of a 1930s factory that had long ago been converted into high-end lofts for a fashion engineering co-op.


No user serviceable parts inside | Quiet Babylon
0 | 13.5.2011 | 3 years ago |


Software to negate the Real Doll digital makeup on all those thumbnails. #predictionstooobvioustomention
@GreatDismal
William Gibson
112 | 3.11.2010 | 3 years ago |


hatethefuture:

Nobody in the meeting mentioned it, though of course an identical terror coursed through the veins of every vice president in attendance: Mr. Norton was supposed to ring the closing bell on the stock market later that afternoon, and what would the shareholders say? It was bad enough that their CEO seemed to have misplaced his front panel, but to go tieless on Wall Street was surely corporate suicide.   

hatethefuture:

Nobody in the meeting mentioned it, though of course an identical terror coursed through the veins of every vice president in attendance: Mr. Norton was supposed to ring the closing bell on the stock market later that afternoon, and what would the shareholders say? It was bad enough that their CEO seemed to have misplaced his front panel, but to go tieless on Wall Street was surely corporate suicide.   

14 | 9.10.2010 | 4 years ago |


feigningforlove:

True
0 | 7.10.2010 | 4 years ago |


The cell should sometimes be tricked into repairing the cut by splicing in the added DNA - a process known as homologous repair. In other words, the extra DNA is added exactly where you want it. Rumour has it that researchers at the biotech company Sigma-Aldrich are the first to use zinc fingers to achieve this in animals.
Just love the company name “Sigma-Aldrich”. Sounds like the cheesiest name possible for some B-rated DNA-horror flick. Quote from New Scientist article “Altered animals”.
5 | 28.5.2010 | 4 years ago |


I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I’ve watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Time to die.

I am preparing mentally for watching the Blade Runner Blu Ray Collectors edition (quote reminded via 70seconds)
1 | 3.2.2010 | 4 years ago |


All the seriously alpha dudes in prison have the tattooed eye-whites and those rattan bones.
RT @GreatDismal (William Gibson)
0 | 1.2.2010 | 4 years ago |


No matter which side you choose, you and your teammates always look like US soldiers, while the enemy always wears ski masks or other garb that marks them as terrorists.
Scott Osborne’s America’s Army Review on Gamespot, via Quiet Babylon
0 | 29.12.2009 | 4 years ago |


This has long been the nightmare scenario within Pentagon cybersecurity circles: a hacker not looking to take down the military grid, but to exploit it for his own purposes. How does a soldier trust an order, if he doesn’t know who else is listening — or who gave the order, in the first place?
On the topic of Insurgents Intercepting Drone Video